Ann Baynard

 

by Penelope Whitworth

Ann Baynard (1672/3–97) Born in Preston, Lancashire, England.  As a child she was educated by her father Edward Baynard in science, mathematics, philosophy, and classical languages and literature. By her early twenties, she had become a ‘subtle disputant’ in the ‘hard and knotty Arguments of Metaphysical Learning.’ [1] She perfected her knowledge of Greek through her study of the New Testament, and wrote a number of Latin and English compositions which have not survived.[2]

Baynard declared that secular learning was worthless unless it led to knowledge of God. She was a diligent churchgoer, never missing daily services unless prevented by illness, and spent much of her time in solitary meditation and other pious exercises. Generous to the poor, she set aside a fixed portion of her income for charity.[3] Baynard was active in her attempts to persuade others to lead a religious life. She urged all young people to study philosophy, and, especially, to read the Bible, with a particular appeal to her own sex to make an effort to educate themselves.[4]

[1] John Prude, curate of St Clement Danes, London, A Sermon at the Funeral of the Learned and Ingenious Mrs. Ann Baynard. Daughter and Only Child of Dr Edward Baynard (London: D. Brown, 1697); Helena Bergmann, “Ann Baynard,” Mary Hays, Female Biography; or, Memoirs of Illustrious and Celebrated Women, of All Ages and Countries (1803) Chawton House Library Series: Women’s Memoirs, ed. Gina Luria Walker, Memoirs of Women Writers Part II (Pickering & Chatto: London, 2013), vol. 5, 341-45, editorial notes, 465-66, on 465.

[2] Sara H. Mendelson, ‘Baynard, Ann (1672/3–1697),’ Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, (Oxford University Press, 2004), accessed 22 March 2014, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/1770.

[3] Mary Hays, “Ann Baynard,” Female Biography; or, Memoirs of Illustrious and Celebrated Women of all Ages and Countries (6 volumes) (London: R. Phillips, 1803), vol. 1, 245-49, on 246.

[4] Hays, “Ann Baynard,” vol. 1, 245-49, on 246.

 

Bibliography

Ballard, G. Memoirs of Several Ladies of Great Britain, who have been celebrated for their writings or skill in the learned languages, arts and sciences. Oxford: W. Jackson, 1752.

Bergmann, Helena. “Ann Baynard.” Mary Hays, Female Biography; or, Memoirs of Illustrious and Celebrated Women, of All Ages and Countries, 1803. Chawton House Library Series: Women’s Memoirs, ed. Gina Luria Walker, Memoirs of Women Writers Part II. Pickering & Chatto: London, 2013, vol. 5, 341-45, editorial notes, 465-66.

Biographium FaemineumThe Female WorthiesorMemoirs of the Most Illustrious Ladies, of all Ages andNations…, 2 vols. London: S. Crowder, and J. Payne, 1766.

Collier, J. and J. Le Clerc. Grand Dictionnaire Historique, T ranslated by Louis Moréri. London: Henry Rhodes, 1721.

Hays, Mary. “Ann Baynard.” Female Biography; or, Memoirs of Illustrious and Celebrated Women of all Ages and Countries (6 volumes). London: R. Phillips, 1803, 245-49.

Mendelson, Sara H. ‘Baynard, Ann (1672/3–1697).’ Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, (Oxford University Press, 2004), accessed 22 March 2014, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/1770.

 

Resources:

Brooklyn Museum
Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art: The Dinner Party: Heritage Floor: Anne Baynard
https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/dinner_party/heritage_floor/anne_baynard.php

 

 

Page citation:
Whitworth, Penelope. “Ann Baynard.” Project Continua (2014): [date accessed], http://www.projectcontinua.org/biographies/index/b_index/ann-baynard/.

 

 

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